Growing Sweet Corn in the Home Garden

You can buy fresh sweet corn in season at a farm stand or supermarket. So if you’ve got a little garden, you’ll want to skip a corn crop and grow vegetables that take up less space. That might be the sensible thing to try to do, but you’d be missing out on an incomparable culinary delight. As a veteran gardener put it, “Fresh corn on the cob picked from your own garden and steamed directly for four minutes is delicious like nothing else.” Whether you grill it, steam it, boil it, or eat it raw, the key to outstanding sweet corn is to eat it within minutes of picking.

Corn isn’t the simplest crop to grow. Besides taking over tons of space, it’s an important feeder, needs continual watering during the warmth of the summer, and is vulnerable to a variety of insect and disease problems. But if you opt to grow it, following the following pointers will help make your crop a sweet success.

CORN GROWING TIPS

1. Choose a sunny spot in your garden to grow your corn.

2. Start with a soil test from your cooperative extension . A soil test will tell you what you would like to try to to to form your soil right for growing corn. Amend the soil consistent with the soil test results, preparing the soil about six inches deep.

3. Select sorts of sweet corn that grow well in your area. Your cooperative extension can tell you which of them of the many varieties are best for your climate and are immune to the local common pests. For a gentle supply of corn plant varieties that mature at different times.

4. Wait until the soil reaches a minimum of 50 degrees F to sow the seeds. Plant the seeds every 12-15 inches in rows 30-36 inches apart. Corn is pollinated by wind; permanently pollination, plant the corn in blocks instead of long rows. Water after sowing.

5. Fertilize when the plants are 12-18 inches high. Control weeds with mulch or hoeing, but take care to not damage roots if you hoe.

6. Keep watering and keep an eye fixed out for insects and diseases. Consult the websites listed below to assist you to identify and treat problems.

7. Ears are able to harvest when the kernels are tightly packed and a milky substance leaks out when punctured with a thumbnail. this is often usually about three weeks after the silk emerges. you’ve got only a brief window of your time to reap at this stage.

8. to reap , grasp an ear firmly, bend it down and pull it down with a twisting motion.

9. Now run to the kitchen and cook it right away!

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